S

SACK
   An empty sack cannot stand upright. ⇒ 教訓154
   Empty sacks will never stand upright. ⇒ 教訓154
   Wishes never can fill a sack. ⇒ 教訓 93
   You may know by a handful the whole sack. ⇒ 教訓 41

SAD
   It is a sad (or poor) heart that never rejoices. ⇒ 教訓 58
   It is a sad house where the hen crows louder than the cock. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(6)
   Of thy sorrow be not too sad, of thy joy be not too glad. ⇒ 教訓 71

SAFE・SAFETY
   Better be safe (or sure) than sorry. ⇒ 教訓118 ・ ⇒ 教訓121
   It is better to be safe than sorry. ⇒ 教訓118 ・ ⇒ 教訓121  
   It is safer to hear and take counsel than to give it. ⇒ 教訓203
   Safety first. ⇒ 教訓121
   Safety lies in the middle course. ⇒ 教訓71・ ⇒ 教訓124
   The beaten road is the safest. ⇒ 教訓124
   The highest branch is not the safest roost. ⇒ 教訓123
   There is safety in numbers. ⇒ 教訓124

SAID
   Easier said than done.  ⇒ 教訓215
   It is easier to be said than done. ⇒ 教訓 98
   Least said, soonest mended. ⇒ 教訓209
   The less said, the better. ⇒ 教訓209

SAIL,SAILOR
   Heaven protects children, sailors, and drunken men. ⇒ 教訓 52
   Hoist your sail when the wind is fair. ⇒ 教訓114

SAINT
   All are not saint that go to church. ⇒教訓 161 
   An open door may tempt a saint. ⇒ 教訓165
   The greater the sinner, ther greater the saint. ⇒ 教訓 3
   Women are saints in church, angels in the street, and devils at home. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(5)
   Young saint, old devil. ⇒ 教訓180

SAINT
   All are not saint that go to church. ⇒教訓 161 
   An open door may tempt a saint. ⇒ 教訓165
   The greater the sinner, ther greater the saint. ⇒ 教訓 3
   Women are saints in church, angels in the street, and devils at home. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(5)
   Young saint, old devil. ⇒ 教訓180

SALT
   Give neither counsel nor salt till you are asked for it. ⇒ 教訓203

SATAN
   Satan always finds work for idle hands. ⇒ 教訓213
   Women are the snares of Satan. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(5)

SATURDAY
   Choose a wife on a Saturday rather than on a Sunday. ⇒ 教訓 25

SAUCE
   Hunger is the best sauce. ⇒ 教訓 90
   What's sauce for the (or a) goose is sauce for the (or a) gander. ⇒ 教訓 55

SAVE
   A penny saved is a penny earned (or gained). ⇒ 教訓30・ ⇒ 教訓157
   A prophet is not without honor, save in his own country (and in his own house).[Matthew] ⇒ 教訓 6
   A stitch in time saves nine. ⇒ 教訓35・ ⇒ 教訓115

SAY
   Do as I say, not as I do. ⇒ 教訓215
   He who says what he likes shall hear what he does not like. ⇒ 教訓222
   If the master say the cow is white the servant must not say 'tis black. ⇒ 教訓144
   It's not what you say, but how you say it. ⇒ 教訓99
   Never say die. ⇒ 教訓60
   Say as men say, but think to yourself. ⇒教訓77・ ⇒ 教訓199
   Saying is one thing and doing another.  ⇒ 教訓215
   Send a wise man on an errand and say nothing unto him. ⇒ 教訓174
   To say and to do are two things. ⇒ 教訓215
   What everybody says must be true. ⇒ 教訓188 
   What will Mrs Grundy say? ⇒ 教訓188
   When a lady says no, she means perhaps; when she says perhaps, she means yes; when she says yes, she is no lady. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(6)
   Whom we love best, to them we can say least. ⇒ 教訓209

SCHOOL
   Don't (or Never) tell tales out of school. ⇒ 教訓135

SCRATCH
   Scratch me (or my back) and I'll scratch you (or your back). ⇒ 教訓 139・ ⇒ 教訓221
   You scratch my back, I'll scratch yours. ⇒ 教訓 139・ ⇒ 教訓221

SCRIPTURE
   The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose. ⇒ 教訓 80・ ⇒ 教訓161

SEA
   In a calm sea every man is a pilot. ⇒ 教訓142
   The sea refuses no river. ⇒ 教訓 37
   There are as good fish in the sea as ever came out of it. ⇒ 教訓119
   There are plenty more fish in the sea. ⇒ 教訓119
   Worse things happen at sea. ⇒ 教訓 62

SEASON
   Everything is good in its season. ⇒ 教訓112

SECOND
   Better be first in the village than second at Rome. ⇒ 教訓145
   Habit is a second nature. ⇒ 教訓243
   It needs more skill than I can tell to play the second fiddle well.[Charles H. Spurgeon] ⇒ 教訓147
   Second thoughts are best. ⇒ 教訓 98
   The first faults are theirs that commit them, the second theirs that permit them. ⇒ 教訓224

SEED
   Good seed makes a good crop. ⇒ 教訓221

SERPENT
   He that has been bitten by a serpent is afraid of a rope. ⇒ 教訓183

SERVANT
   Fire is a good servant but a bad master. ⇒ 教訓122
   If the master say the cow is white the servant must not say 'tis black. ⇒ 教訓144
   Money is a good servant, but a bad master. ⇒ 教訓152

SERVE
   First come, first served. ⇒ 教訓115
   He that has not served knows not how to command. ⇒ 教訓147
   He that is a master must serve another. ⇒ 教訓147
   No man can serve two masters.[Matthew] ⇒ 教訓 85
   Revenge is a dish best served cold.⇒ 教訓 224
   They also serve who only stand and wait. ⇒ 教訓104
   You cannot serve God and mammon.[Matthew] ⇒ 教訓 85
   Youth will (or must) be served. ⇒ 教訓179

SHADE
   Great trees are good for nothing but shade. ⇒ 教訓 38
   What is the good of a sundial in the shade? ⇒ 教訓229

SHADOW
   Catch not at the shadow and lose the substance. ⇒ 教訓 25
   Coming events cast their shadows before. ⇒ 教訓 41

SHAME
Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me. ⇒ 教訓233
   If a man deceives me once, shame on him; if he deceives me twice, shame on me. ⇒ 教訓233
   Shame take him that shame thinks. ⇒ 教訓222
   Tell the truth and shame the devil. ⇒ 教訓189

SHARER
   A bad shearer never had a good sickle. ⇒ 教訓 82

SHEEP
   As well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb. ⇒ 教訓162.
   If one sheep leaps over the ditch, all the rest will follow. ⇒ 教訓143
   It is a foolish sheep that makes the wolf his confessor. ⇒ 教訓235
   There is a black sheep in every flock. ⇒ 教訓130
   Two heads are better than one, even if the one's a sheep's. ⇒ 教訓185

SHEPHERD
   A red sky at night is the shepherd's delight. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(3)
   Red sky at night, shepherd's delight; red sky in the morning, shepherd's warning. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(3)

SHIELD
   Look on both sides of the shield. ⇒ 教訓 1

SHIP
   A little leak sink a great ship. ⇒ 教訓 34
   A woman and a ship ever want mending. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(5)
   Don't spoil the ship for half a penny's worth of tar. ⇒ 教訓 34
   It is no use spoiling the ship for a ha'p'orth of tar. ⇒ 教訓 34

SHIRT
   Near is my shirt, but nearer is my skin. ⇒ 教訓 4
   The last shirt has no pockets. ⇒ 教訓153

SHOE,SHOEMAKER
   For want of a nail the shoe was lost. ⇒ 教訓 34
   For want of a nail the shoe was lost; for want of a shoe the horse was lost; and for want of a horse the man (or rider) was lost. ⇒ 教訓 34
   It is ill waiting for dead men's shoes. ⇒ 教訓 93
   Only the wearer knows where the shoe pinches. ⇒ 教訓183
   The shoemaker's son always goes barefoot. ⇒ 教訓157
   Who is worse shod than the shoemaker's wife? ⇒ 教訓157

SHOOT,SHOOTER
   He who shoots often, hits at last. ⇒教訓 37 ⇒教訓103
   The arrow shot upright falls on the shooter's head. ⇒ 教訓222

SHOP
   Keep your shop and your shop will keep you. ⇒ 教訓221
   Women in state affairs are like monkeys in glass shops. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(6)

SHORT
   Art is long, life is short.[Hippocrates] 教訓107
   Good company on the road is the shortest cut. ⇒ 教訓109
   It is no meddling with short daggers. 教訓77, ⇒ 教訓144
   Life is short and time is swift. ⇒ 教訓107
   Short reckonings make long friends. ⇒ 教訓137・ ⇒ 教訓158
   The longer east the shorter west. ⇒ 教訓 3
   The shortest way round is the longest way home. ⇒ 教訓100・ ⇒ 教訓124
   Women have long hair and short brains. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(6)

SWEET
   A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.[Shakespeare] ⇒ 教訓 28
   Forbidden fruit is sweetest. ⇒ 教訓 12
   From the sweetest wine, the tartest vinegar. ⇒ 教訓  3
   Hunger makes hard bones sweet beans. ⇒ 教訓 90
   Knowledge has bitter roots but sweet fruits. ⇒ 教訓172
   Life is sweet. ⇒ 教訓56
   Little fish are sweet. ⇒ 教訓 29
   Love is sweet in the beginning but sour in the ending. 教訓 88
   No sweet without sweat. ⇒ 教訓105
   Stolen fruit is sweet. ⇒ 教訓 12
   Stolen pleasures are sweetest. ⇒ 教訓 12
   Sweet are the uses of adversity.[Shakespeare] ⇒ 教訓 62
   Take the bitter with the sweet. ⇒ 教訓 57
   Take the sweet with the sour. ⇒ 教訓 57
   The apples on the other side of the wall are the sweetest. ⇒ 教訓 12
   The sweetest wine makes the sharpest (or tartest) vinegar. ⇒ 教訓  3
   There is great force hidden in a sweet command. ⇒ 教訓 99

SHOULDER
   A dwarf on a giant's shoulder sees the farther of the two. ⇒ 教訓185
   You cannot put old heads on young shoulders. ⇒ 教訓178

SHOWER
   April showers bring forth May flowers. 教訓 58
   March winds and April showers bring forth May flowers. ⇒ 教訓 58

SICK,SICKNESS
   Health is not valued till sickness comes. ⇒ 教訓 8
   Hope deferred maketh (makes) the heart sick.[Proverbs] ⇒ 教訓 15

SIDE
   Every man has his weak side. ⇒ 教訓232
   Every medal has two sides. ⇒ 教訓 1
   God (or Providence) is always on the side of the big battalions. ⇒ 教訓 52
   Know which side one's bread is buttered on. ⇒ 教訓156
   Look on both sides of the shield. ⇒ 教訓 1
   The apples on the other side of the wall are the sweetest. ⇒ 教訓 12
   The bread never falls but on its buttered side. ⇒ 教訓 51
   The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. ⇒ 教訓 12
   There are two sides to every question. ⇒ 教訓 1
   There is another side to the picture. ⇒ 教訓 1

SIGHT
   Hindsight is better than foresight. ⇒ 教訓176
   In vain the net is spread in the sight of the bird. ⇒ 教訓 81
   Out of sight, out of mind. ⇒ 教訓 14

SILENT,SILENCE
   Beware of a silent man (or dog) and still water. ⇒ 教訓197
   More have repented speech than silence. ⇒ 教訓198
   Silence gives (or means) consent. ⇒ 教訓207
   Silent men, like still water, are deep and dangerous. ⇒ 教訓197
   Speech is silver, silence is gold. ⇒ 教訓209
   Silence is golden. ⇒ 教訓209
   There is a time to speak and a time to be silent. ⇒ 教訓208

SILK
   He that hath not silver in his purse should have silk in (or on) his tongue. ⇒ 教訓150
   The fairest silk is soonest stained. ⇒ 教訓 17
   You cannot make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. ⇒ 教訓240

SILVER
   Every cloud has a silver lining. ⇒ 教訓 58
   He that hath not silver in his purse should have silk in (or on) his tongue. ⇒ 教訓150
   Speech is silver, silence is gold. ⇒ 教訓209
   Silence is golden. ⇒ 教訓209

SING
   If you sing before breakfast, you will cry before night. ⇒ 教訓 63
   Sing before breakfast, cry before night. ⇒ 教訓 63
   The opera ain't (isn't) over till the fat lady sings. ⇒ 教訓104

SINGLE
   Beauty draws with A single hair. ⇒ 教訓 18
   Better be still single than ill married. ⇒ 教訓257
   The longest journey begins with a single step. ⇒ 教訓 87・ ⇒ 教訓103

SIN,SINNER
   Charity covers a multitude of sins.[Peter] ⇒ 教訓25
   Poverty is no sin. ⇒ 教訓157
   The greater the sinner, ther greater the saint. ⇒ 教訓 3
   There is a sin of omission as well as of commission. ⇒ 教訓213

SKELETON
   Every family has a skeleton in the cupboard. ⇒ 教訓232

SKILLIt needs more skill than I can tell to play the second fiddle well.[Charles H. Spurgeon] ⇒ 教訓147

SKIN
   Beauty is but (or only) skin deep.[John Davies of Hereford] ⇒ 教訓 17
   Catch your bear before you sell its skin. ⇒ 教訓 65
   Else the wine will burst the skins, and the wine perishes and the skins.[Matthew] ⇒ 教訓 67
   Near is my shirt, but nearer is my skin. ⇒ 教訓 4

SKY
   A red sky at night is the shepherd's delight. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(3)
   If the sky falls, we shall catch larks. ⇒ 教訓105
   Red sky at night, shepherd's delight; red sky in the morning, shepherd's warning. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(3)
   When the sky (or heaven) falls, We shall have (or catch) larks. ⇒ 教訓105

SLAVE
   He who goes against the fashion is himself its slave.[Logan Pearsall Smith] ⇒ 教訓 3
   We are all slaves of opinion. ⇒ 教訓188

SLEEP
   A quiet conscience sleeps in thunder. ⇒ 教訓261
   Let sleeping dogs lie. ⇒ 教訓121
   Sleep is better than medicine. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(3)
   Wake not a sleeping lion. ⇒ 教訓121

SLIP
   There's many a slip between the cup and the lip. ⇒ 教訓 65

SLOW,SLOWLY
   Heaven's vengeance is slow but sure. ⇒教訓 54
   Make haste slowly. ⇒ 教訓 3・ ⇒ 教訓 98
   Slow and steady wins the race.[Aesop] ⇒ 教訓 98
   Slow but sure wins the race.[Aesop] ⇒ 教訓 98
   Slow but sure. ⇒ 教訓98
   The mills of God grind slowly. [George Herbert] ⇒ 教訓54

SMALL
   Better are small fish than an empty dish. ⇒ 教訓 74
   Good things come in small packages. ⇒ 教訓 24
   He that corrects not small faults, will not control great ones. ⇒ 教訓 35
   It's a small world. ⇒ 教訓 3
   Little (or Small) pitchers have long (or large, or great) ears. ⇒ 教訓199
   No great loss but some small profit. ⇒ 教訓 1
   Small is beautiful. ⇒ 教訓 29
   The best things come in small packages. ⇒ 教訓 24

SMELL
   A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.[Shakespeare] ⇒ 教訓 28
   The smell of garlic takes away the smell of onions. ⇒ 教訓166

SMOKE
   No smoke without fire. ⇒ 教訓217
   There is no smoke without fire.  ⇒ 教訓217
   Where there's smoke, there's fire. ⇒ 教訓217

SMOOTH
   Take the rough with the smooth. ⇒ 教訓 57
   The course of true love never did run smooth.[Shakespeare] ⇒ 教訓252

SNAKE
   Take heed of the snake in the grass. ⇒ 教訓 22

SNARE
   Women are the snares of Satan. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(5)

SOBER, SOBERNESS
   Playful (or Wanton) kittens make sober cats. ⇒ 教訓180
   What soberness conceals, drunkenness reveals. ⇒ 教訓190

SOFT,SOFTLY
   A quiet conscience is a soft pillow. ⇒ 教訓261
   A soft answer turns (or turneth) away wrath.[Proverbs] ⇒ 教訓 99
   Speak softly and carry a big stick. ⇒ 教訓64

SOLDIER
   Old soldiers never die (, they simply fade away ). ⇒ 教訓 57

SOMEONE
   Someone cannot see beyond the end of his nose. ⇒ 教訓 43
   Someone is not out of the woods yet. ⇒ 教訓 43

SOMETHING
   If you want something done, ask a busy person. ⇒ 教訓 108
   Keep something for a rainy day. ⇒ 教訓157
   Nothing is so bad in which there is not something of good. ⇒ 教訓 1
   Something is better than nothing. ⇒ 教訓 74
   You do not get something for nothing. ⇒ 教訓158

SONG
   Bread is better than the songs of birds. ⇒ 教訓155

SORROW
   Company in distress makes sorrow light. ⇒ 教訓139
   Joy and sorrow are next door neighbors. ⇒ 教訓  2
   Of thy sorrow be not too sad, of thy joy be not too glad. ⇒ 教訓 71
   When shared, joy is doubled and sorrow halved. ⇒ 教訓139

SOUL
   Brevity is the soul of wit.[Shakespeare] ⇒ 教訓209

SOUND
   A sound mind in a sound body.[Juvenalis] ⇒ 教訓 67
   Empty vessels make the most sound. ⇒ 教訓23 ・ ⇒ 教訓212

SOURCE
   A (or The) stream cannot rise above its source. ⇒ 教訓 67

SOW
   As you sow, so shall you reap.[Galatians] ⇒ 教訓220
   Early sow, early mow. ⇒ 教訓115
   He that sows thistles shall reap prickles. ⇒ 教訓222
   He that sows virtue, reaps fame. ⇒ 教訓221
   One man sows and another reaps. ⇒ 教訓 2
   Sow the wind and reap the whirlwind.[Hosea] ⇒ 教訓222
   The young will sow their wild oats.⇒ 教訓179
   They that sow the wind shall reap the whirlwind. ⇒ 教訓222
   Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.[Galatians] ⇒ 教訓220
   You cannot make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. ⇒ 教訓240

SPADE
   Call a spade a spade. ⇒ 教訓196

SPEECH
   More have repented speech than silence. ⇒ 教訓198
   Speech is silver, silence is gold. ⇒ 教訓209
   Silence is golden. ⇒ 教訓209
   Speech is the picture of the mind. ⇒ 教訓194

SPEND,SPENT
   Never spend your money before you have it. ⇒ 教訓 65
   Soon got, soon spent. ⇒ 教訓149

SPIRIT
   The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak.[Matthew] ⇒ 教訓 93

SPIT
   Who spits against heaven (or the wind), it falls in his face. ⇒ 教訓222

SPOON
   He should have a long spoon that sups with the devil. ⇒ 教訓130
   He who gives fair words feeds you with an empty spoon. ⇒ 教訓210
   He who sups with the Devil should have A long spoon. ⇒ 教訓130

SPRAT
   Throw out a sprat to catch a mackerel.《サバを捕るには小エビを捨てよ》「海老で鯛を釣る」 ⇒ 教訓 31

SPRING(春),SPRING(泉・涌く)
   An ill-marriage is a spring of ill fortune. ⇒ 教訓257
   Hope springs eternal in the human breast.[Alexander Pope] ⇒ 教訓 60
   Hope springs eternal. ⇒ 教訓 60
   If winter comes, can spring be far behind? [Percy Bysshe Shelley] ⇒ 教訓 58
   It is not spring until you can plant your foot upon twelve daisies. ⇒ 教訓 44
   Of a thorn springs not a fig.[Matthew]  ⇒ 教訓240
   The greatest hate springs from the greattest love. ⇒教訓 3
   When you tread on nine daisies at once, spring has come. ⇒ 教訓 44

STABLE
   It is too late to shut the stable door after the horse has bolted. ⇒ 教訓117

STEAL,STOLEN
   Hang a thief when he's young, and he'll not steal when he's old. ⇒ 教訓 35
   He that will lie will steal. ⇒教訓507
   He that will steal an egg will steal an ox. ⇒ 教訓162
   He that would eat the kernel must crack the nut. ⇒ 教訓105
   Steal a pig and give the feet for alms. ⇒ 教訓 161
   It is too late to lock the stable when the horse has been stolen. ⇒ 教訓117
   Stolen fruit is sweet. ⇒ 教訓 12
   Stolen pleasures are sweetest. ⇒ 教訓 12

STEP
   A journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. ⇒ 教訓30・ ⇒ 教訓103
   Discontent is the first step in progress. ⇒ 教訓 90
   From the sublime to the ridiculous is but (or only) a step.[Napoleon Bonaparte] ⇒ 教訓 3
   It is the first step that is difficult. ⇒ 教訓 87
   The first step is always the hardest. ⇒ 教訓 87
   The longest journey begins with a single step. ⇒ 教訓 87・ ⇒ 教訓103

STICK
   A stick is quickly found to beat a dog with. ⇒ 教訓223
   Fling (or Throw) dirt enough and some will stick. ⇒ 教訓 37・ ⇒ 教訓201
   Let the cobbler stick to his last. ⇒ 教訓 83
   Speak softly and carry a big stick. ⇒ 教訓64
   Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me. ⇒ 教訓211

STING
   Bees that have honey in their mouths have stings in their tails. ⇒ 教訓 23
   First impressions are most lasting. ⇒ 教訓 87
   If you gently touch a nettle it'll sting you for your pains. ⇒ 教訓 96
   It is ill jesting with edged tools. ⇒ 教訓122
   The balance distinguishes not between gold and lead. ⇒ 教訓 55
   The sting of a reproach is the truth of it. ⇒ 教訓189

STINK
   A fish stinks from the head. ⇒ 教訓144
   Don't cry stinking fish. ⇒ 教訓234
   Fish and guests stink after three days. ⇒ 教訓 6
   The fish always stinks from the head downwards. ⇒ 教訓144

STITCH
   A stitch in time saves nine. ⇒ 教訓35・ ⇒ 教訓115

STOMACH
   An army marches on its stomach. ⇒ 教訓155
   The way to a man's heart is through his stomach. ⇒ 教訓155

STONE
   A little stone in the way overturns a great wain. ⇒ 教訓 33
   A rolling stone gathers no moss. ⇒ 教訓103
   Cast not the first stone.[John] ⇒ 教訓223
   Constant dropping wears away the stone. ⇒ 教訓103
   Leave no stones unturned. ⇒ 教訓101
   Never take a stone to break an egg, when you can do it with the back of your knife. ⇒ 教訓 69 ・ ⇒ 教訓 81
   Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me. ⇒ 教訓211
   Those who live in glass houses should never throw stones. ⇒ 教訓223
   Whether the pitcher strikes the stone, or the stone the pitcher, it is bad for the pitcher. ⇒ 教訓 77, ⇒ 教訓144
   You cannot get water (or blood) out of stone. ⇒ 教訓 76

STOOL
   Between two stools you fall to the ground. ⇒ 教訓 84

STORM,STORMY
   A red morning foretells a stormy day. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(3)
   A storm in a glass of water. ⇒ 教訓39
   After a calm comes a storm. ⇒ 教訓2・ ⇒ 教訓 63
   After a storm comes a calm. ⇒ 教訓2・ ⇒ 教訓 58
   Any port in a storm. ⇒ 教訓74・ ⇒ 教訓127
   Oaks may fall when reeds stand the storm. ⇒ 教訓 38
   The sharper the storm, the sooner it's over. ⇒ 教訓 59
   Vows made in storms are forgotten in calms. ⇒ 教訓 53

STRAIGHT
   Half the truth can be worse than a straight lie. ⇒ 教訓161・  ⇒ 教訓193
   Straight trees have crooked roots. ⇒ 教訓 23
   You cannot make a crab walk straight. ⇒ 教訓 76

STRAW
   A drowning man will catch at a straw. ⇒ 教訓127・ ⇒ 教訓154
   A straw shows which way the wind blows. ⇒ 教訓 41
   It is the last straw that breaks the camel's back. ⇒ 教訓 34・ ⇒ 教訓 71
   The last straw breaks the camel's back. ⇒ 教訓 34・ ⇒ 教訓 71
   You cannot make bricks without straw.[Exodus] ⇒ 教訓 78

STREAM
   A (or The) stream cannot rise above its source. ⇒ 教訓 67
   Cross the stream where it is shallowest. ⇒ 教訓 76
   Don't change horses in mid-stream. ⇒ 教訓101
   It is ill striving against the stream. ⇒ 教訓 77

STRENGTH
   In unity there is strength. ⇒ 教訓134
   The strength of the chain is in the weakest link. ⇒ 教訓 40
   Union is strength. ⇒ 教訓134
   Wisdom is better than strength (or force). ⇒ 教訓172

STRIKE
   Lightning never strikes twice in the same place. ⇒ 教訓 58
   Strike while the iron is hot. ⇒ 教訓114
   Whether the pitcher strikes the stone, or the stone the pitcher, it is bad for the pitcher. ⇒ 教訓 77, ⇒ 教訓144

STRING
   A woman need but look on her apron-string to find an excuse. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(5)
   Harp not for ever on the same string. ⇒ 教訓110

STROKE
   An oak is not felled at one stroke. ⇒ 教訓 37
   Little strokes fell great oaks. ⇒ 教訓103

STING,STUNG
   He who handles a nettle tenderly is soonest stung. ⇒ 教訓 96
   It is better to be stung by a nettle than pricked by a rose. ⇒ 教訓138

STYLE
   The style is the man. ⇒ 教訓194

SUBLIME
   From the sublime to the ridiculous is but (or only) a step.[Napoleon Bonaparte] ⇒ 教訓 3

SUCCEED
   If at first you don't succeed, try, try, try again. ⇒ 教訓103
   Nothing succeeds like success. ⇒ 教訓 50・ ⇒ 教訓148

SUCCESS
   Diligence is the mother of success (or good luck). ⇒ 教訓 54
   Failure teaches success. ⇒ 教訓183
   Nothing succeeds like success. ⇒ 教訓 50・ ⇒ 教訓148
   Success has many friends. ⇒ 教訓136・ ⇒ 教訓150

SUFFICIENT
   A word to the wise is sufficient (or enough). ⇒ 教訓41・ ⇒ 教訓174
   Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof.[Matthew] ⇒ 教訓 61

SUMMER
   One swallow does not make a summer. ⇒ 教訓 44
   The rich man has his ice in the summer and the poor man gets his in the winter. ⇒ 教訓 55

SUN
   If red the sun begins his race, expect that rain will flow apace.  ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(3)
   If there were no cloud, we should not enjoy the sun. ⇒ 教訓 62
   Make hay while the sun shines. ⇒ 教訓114
   The sun is never the worse for shining on a dunghill. ⇒ 教訓131
   The sun loses nothing by shining into a puddle. ⇒ 教訓131
   The sun shines upon all alike. ⇒ 教訓 55
   There is nothing new under the sun.[Ecclesiastes] ⇒ 教訓 48
   What is the good of a sundial in the shade? ⇒ 教訓229

SWALLOW
   One swallow does not make a summer. ⇒ 教訓 44

SWEEP
   A new broom sweeps clean. ⇒ 教訓 87
   If each would sweep before the door, we should have a clean city. ⇒ 教訓 40
   If Every man would sweep his own doorstep the city would Soon be clean. ⇒ 教訓 40
   New brooms sweep clean. ⇒ 教訓 87

SWEET
   A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.[Shakespeare] ⇒ 教訓 28
   Forbidden fruit is sweetest. ⇒ 教訓 12
   From the sweetest wine, the tartest vinegar. ⇒ 教訓  3
   Hunger makes hard bones sweet beans. ⇒ 教訓 90
   Knowledge has bitter roots but sweet fruits. ⇒ 教訓172
   Life is sweet. ⇒ 教訓56
   Little fish are sweet. ⇒ 教訓 29
   Love is sweet in the beginning but sour in the ending. ⇒ 教訓 88
   No sweet without sweat. ⇒ 教訓105
   Stolen fruit is sweet. ⇒ 教訓 12
   Stolen pleasures are sweetest. ⇒ 教訓 12
   Sweet are the uses of adversity.[Shakespeare] ⇒ 教訓 62
   Take the bitter with the sweet. ⇒ 教訓 57
   Take the sweet with the sour. ⇒ 教訓 57
   The apples on the other side of the wall are the sweetest. ⇒ 教訓 12
   The sweetest wine makes the sharpest (or tartest) vinegar. ⇒ 教訓 3
   There is great force hidden in a sweet command. ⇒ 教訓 99

SWINE
   Cast not (or Do not throw) pearls before swine.[Matthew] ⇒ 教訓 67

SWING
   What one loses on the swings one makes up (or gains) on the roundabouts. ⇒ 教訓 58
   What one loses on the swings one makes up on the roundabouts. ⇒ 教訓 58
   What you lose on the swings you gain on the roundabouts. ⇒ 教訓 58
   Youth will have its course (or swing). ⇒ 教訓179・ ⇒ 教訓236

SWORD
   A woman's sword is her tongue, and she does not let it rust. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(5)
   All they that take the sword shall perish with the sword. ⇒ 教訓222
   Gluttony kills more than the sword. ⇒ コトワザこぼれ話(3)
   He who lives by the sword dies by the sword. ⇒ 教訓222
   Live by the sword, die by the sword. ⇒ 教訓222
   The pen is mightier than the sword. ⇒ 教訓188
   Words cut more than swords. ⇒ 教訓188


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